Chiang Mai Pork Curry (geng hang lae)

Chiang Mai Pork Curry (geng hang lae)

By 29 May, 2012

This warming rich curry is from David Thompson’s Thai Food. David attended a function with Thai Prime Minister, Mrs Yingluck Shihawata, on the weekend at the Shangri-la,  Sydney, to promote Thai Food Week at the hotel.  Together they made the popular Thai green papaya salad (som dtam) in front of an audience of visiting and local Thai dignitaries.
He explains that this curry comes from northern Thailand, and is sometimes called a Burmese curry. Similar in complexity to a mussaman, (also an imported curry), this thick and oily dish is redolent of spices that suggest an Indian origin, not far from the borders of Myamar.
This is a curry which keeps well and improves on keeping, so always make more than necessary.

Ingredients

Instructions

Serves 4, as part of a Thai meal with rice and a few accompaniments such as deep-fried fish, crispy fried pork and deep fried fried pork skin. David suggests you make more than necessary as it keeps well - and improves on keeping.

First, make the curry paste – it’s easier to do this in a blender but you can use a pestle and mortar, if liked. Puree half the ingredients at a time in the blender, adding a little water if needed and using a spatula to loosen the paste from the sides.  Press or strain the first batch to extract as much liquid as possible and then add this liquid to the second batch before pureeing – this will ensure the paste is less dilute and will cook more successfully.  Combine the batches well.
Make the garlic and ginger paste by pounding the ingredients using a pestle and mortar.
Blanch the pork belly and ribs twice from a cold water start.  Refresh, and when cool, cut pork belly into 2cm cubes.
Heat fat or oil, and fry garlic and ginger paste until golden.  Add curry paste and pork and simmer for several minutes, stirring regularly.  Add shallots, ginger, pickled garlic, pickled garlic syrup and peanuts.  Season with palm sugar, fish sauce and tamarind water. Cover with stock or water and simmer for one hour, or until pork is tender.
Check seasoning: it should be salty, sweet and sour, with flavours of ginger and star anise.
Serve with steamed jasmine rice.  David suggests accompaniments such as deep-fried fish, crispy fried pork and deep-fried pork skin.

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4 Responses to Chiang Mai Pork Curry (geng hang lae)

  1. Linda

    How many does this serve? Want to try this recipe for 8 hungry adults!

  2. Sheridan

    Hi Linda,
    Serves 4, as part of a Thai meal with rice and a few accompaniments such as deep-fried fish, crispy fried pork and deep fried fried pork skin. David suggests you make more than necessary as it keeps well – and improves on keeping. I’d triple it for those hungry lads.
    Sheridan

  3. rodney d.

    hello i have been travelling to and from thailand since 2007 , i tried this dish unsure of what it was taste wise many years ago ,i have been hooked since then ,very tasty ,have franchise restaurant S&P in pattaya and bangkok also elsewhere which sells them ,although i believe the recipe above must be really great ..but for those travelling soon you could try them at the restaurant mentioned ..sawadee krap aroy mak mak …

  4. Sheridan

    Thanks for the heads-up, Rodney 🙂

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